Sunday, May 28, 2017

Anti Harassment & Workplace Violence Training

Do all of the managers within your business understand their responsibilities and how they are to respond if they become aware of workplace harassment or workplace violence? If you, or your managers, do not understand these obligations, this could lead to an unsafe work environment and serious legal penalties for the entire company.

Bill 132, amended the Occupational Health and Safety Act as of September 2016 and it requiresAnti Harassment and Anti Violence Training employers with more than 5 employees to train all of their staff on anti harassment and anti violence prevention. Employers have obligations under the Occupational Health and Safety Act to protect workers from all sources of violence. The goal of the legislation is to support the prevention of  workplace violence and workplace harassment.  The Respectful Workplace, is interactive workshop designed to remind your team members of the acceptable and unacceptable workplace behaviours and their responsibilities to maintain a healthy work environment. 

The HR Reporter indicated "In the year after Ontario passed amendments to the Occupational Health and Safety Act to address workplace violence and harassment, the province has issued about 1,100 orders related to the new legislation, according to the Ministry of Labour.

Contact us today  to book a 1/2 day workshop for your staff

AODA - Disability Customer Service

Who Must Comply and By When?

The AODA is the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, a piece of legislation that became law in 2005. The AODA is made up of five standards that are being intrVarious accessibiity icons are shown to show the needs of people with different disabilities. Clicking on the image will load AODA demo course.oduced in a staggered roll out. The first to come into effect is the Customer Service Standard.

The Customer Service standard applies to all people, businesses and organizations that:
provide goods or services either directly to the public or to other businesses or organizations in Ontario; and have one or more employees in Ontario.

For example, if you have a call centre in Nova Scotia...or anywhere in the world...that provides service to customers in Ontario, they are affected by AODA.

What Do You Need To Do?

Train staff, volunteers, contractors and any other people who interact with the public or other third parties on your behalf.

Recent Court Decisions

Here are the links for the relevant court cases regarding BIll 168 or sexual harassment.

Ljuboja v Aim Group Inc, 2013 CanLII 76529 (ON LRB) Labour Relations Board rules on reprisal termination.
Kingston (City) v Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 109, 2011 CanLII 50313 (ON LA) - The courts upheld the employee's termination. August 2011
The lie, not the affair, got the manager fired - Vancouver Sun - May 2012 - Best practice suggested for sexual harassment policy.
Canada (Human Rights Commission) v. Canada (Attorney General), 2012 FC 445 (CanLII)2012-04-18Federal Court of Canada — Canada (Federal) 
Vanessa Knight-Ezzard v Ontario Native Women's Association, 2011 CanLII 81721 (ON LRB)
Perron v Ontario Native Women's Association, 2011 CanLII 81786 (ON LRB)
Ontario Public Service Employees Union (Lefkowitz) v Ontario (Community Safety and Correctional Services), 2011 CanLII 83718 (ON GSB)


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